OEcotextiles

Indulgent yet responsible fabrics

Textile certifications

O Ecotextiles (and Two Sisters Ecotextiles)

Don’t forget to take a look at our new retail website (Two Sisters Ecotextiles) and let us know what you think.  We’re still working out some kinks so your input is really appreciated. In the textile industry, there are two third party certifications which are transparent and to which we certify our fabrics: the Global …

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Global Organic Textile Standard

O Ecotextiles (and Two Sisters Ecotextiles)

In the 1980’s, producers of eco-friendly textiles generally worked under the umbrella of  organic food associations.  However, they found that the food association was impractical for textile producers because  although the growing and harvesting of food and fiber crops were similar, the processing of fibers in preparation to make fabric varied widely.  The organic food …

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Certifications: Oeko Tex

O Ecotextiles (and Two Sisters Ecotextiles)

I have an apology to make:  I made a statement last week that turns out to be incorrect, based on experience from years ago.  I said “it’s not unusual to find a GOTS certification logo on a product – because it’s hard to get, and those who have it certainly want to display the logo.  …

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Certifications – part 1

O Ecotextiles (and Two Sisters Ecotextiles)

If you agree with me that a third party certification is a way to give us the most unbiased, substantive  information about the environmental performance of a fabric, let’s look at third party certifications which are on the market and which test finished textiles.  It’s important to know what each certification is telling us, both …

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Organic cotton fraud?

O Ecotextiles (and Two Sisters Ecotextiles)

A recent report in The Financial Times of Germany alleged  that a ‘gigantic fraud’ was taking place in the sale of cotton garments marked as organic by leading European retailers like H&M, C&A and Tchibo, because they actually contained genetically modified (GM)  cotton.   GM cotton (often called Bt cotton in India) is prohibited in …

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A new study focused on global water issues, commissioned by an  international network of  scientists,   found that people around the world view water issues as the planet’s top environmental problem –  greater than air pollution, depletion of natural resources, loss of habitat or climate change. (click here to read more on this study).  That shouldn’t …

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Apparently Good Housekeeping now has a green seal of approval.  UL laboratories, the safety test lab, also has it’s own green seal of approval.  In fact, according to the new 2009 Conscious Consumer Report from BBMG, there are now over 400 different certifications  related to “green” and environmental attributes of products and services.  So many …

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What does organic wool mean?

O Ecotextiles (and Two Sisters Ecotextiles)

Last week we talked about the importance of livestock management in the battle against climate change.  It came as a real revelation to this city girl that large grazing animals are a vital and necessary part of the solution to climate change.   Sheep can actually help to improve soils, which improves the soil’s ability to …

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What is Sensuede?

O Ecotextiles (and Two Sisters Ecotextiles)

Sensuede is, according to its website, an elegant, supple, high performance textile made with recycled fibers. But Sensuede is not a fabric we’d be excited about selling, and let us tell you why:  Sensuade is just a brand name for a polyester microfiber.  Ultrasuede was the first of its type.  But all microfibers are made in …

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