OEcotextiles

Indulgent yet responsible fabrics

After last week’s discussion, I think you understand why it’s important to remember that whether one uses natural or synthetic dyes a major concern is not only what type of dye the dyer uses, but whether the dyer has water treatment in place!    That’s because neither natural dyes nor synthetic dyes (plus the associated mordants, …

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I thought we’d take a look at the dyeing process because so many people ask if we use “natural” dyes.  The answer is no, we don’t (although we’re not entirely objecting to natural dyes), and I hope the next two blogs will explain our position!  Let’s first take a look at what makes the dyes …

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Beyond natural fibers

O Ecotextiles (and Two Sisters Ecotextiles)

It looks like the plastic bottle is here to stay, despite publicity about bisphenol A and other chemicals that may leach into liquids inside the bottle. The amount of plastic used to make the bottles is so enormous that estimates of total amount of plastic used is staggering. Earth911.com says that over 2,456 million pounds …

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At the  International Federation of Organic Agriculture Movements (IFOAM ) Congress   in February, 2011, Ann Shankar from Biodye India, a company that produces natural dyes based on wild plants,  made a provocative suggestion –  that the term “organic textile” is not an accurate description of any textile where synthetic dyes and auxiliaries are used.  The …

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Dyes and regulation

O Ecotextiles (and Two Sisters Ecotextiles)

Hello Azhahia: There are many, many prohibited dyes. GOTS prohibits the use of all amine releasing azo dyes, for instance. This prohibited category includes the following chemical compounds with their CAR RN (chemical label) : Azo dyes (Restricted amines – from Azo dyes) 4- Aminodiphenyl (92-67-1) Benzidine (92-87-5) 4-Chloro-o-Toluidine (95-69-2) 2- Napthylamine (91-59-8) o-Aminoazotoluene (97-56-3) …

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“I believe we stand at a turning point in history. For the first time, humans are no longer just affected by weather cycles, we are affecting those cycles—and suffering the consequences of doing so.” Patricia Espinosa,  UN Climate Change Executive Secretary Climate change is without a shadow of a doubt, one of the most pressing problems …

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FabricsellerA

O Ecotextiles (and Two Sisters Ecotextiles)

A company that sells fabric on line has a post about why they don’t offer Oeko-Tex certification.  Their post is woefully incorrect. We do not name the company, but call it FabricsellerA. Their post, titled,   Why Oeko-Tex certification is NOT Relevant to American Made Fabrics,  (the entirety of which you can read below at the end …

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What is Sensuede?

O Ecotextiles (and Two Sisters Ecotextiles)

Sensuede is, according to its website, an elegant, supple, high performance textile made with recycled fibers. But Sensuede is not a fabric we’d be excited about selling, and let us tell you why:  Sensuade is just a brand name for a polyester microfiber.  Ultrasuede was the first of its type.  But all microfibers are made in …

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Not Michael Pollan’s Food Rules

O Ecotextiles (and Two Sisters Ecotextiles)

One of the presenters at the 2011 Living Building Challenge (whose name I’ve been trying to find, but cannot – so apologies to the presenter who remains unnamed), inspired by writer Michael Pollan’s Food Rules, shared a list of ways to choose products that remove the worst of the chemical contamination that plagues many products. …

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